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Digital Knitting

 
 

Digital Knitting —

During my time on exchange at Designskolen Kolding in Denmark, I had the opportunity to learn how to programme for and use a digital knitting machine. It is something I have wanted to do for a long time and one of the reasons why I applied to exchange in Kolding. The knit technician taught me the basics and I then got to explore techniques and arrangements on my own.  

The aim of this project was to bring the Design for Change project into a present context and explore the multifunctionality of knitwear. The key features I decided to focus on were double-sides, stretch, insulating, wind and water repellant, tear strength, sweat transportation and lightness. I took visual inspiration from nature and the lifecycle of trees, with visible ageing in bark, moss, leaves and how one can portrait these lifecycles in knitting patterns. The designs are generated based on ink drawings and then programmed on a trial and error basis, where each sample was thoroughly tested in Stoll’s M1 plus and thereafter knitted in waste yarn, before being knitted in final yarns. I have experience in programming basic knit structures, jacquards and also using the Colour Arrangement feature, which I used to explore the options in bubble stitch and 3D textures.

 
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Samples

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Process and Notes

Before knitting out the final samples, I would check the files in the Stoll M1 Plus software and knit them out in waste yarn as technical samples. This was to avoid waste in expensive yarns and allowed me to build up a great portfolio of files with notes on what went well and what went wrong and how to fix it for further development.

Before knitting out the final samples, I would check the files in the Stoll M1 Plus software and knit them out in waste yarn as technical samples. This was to avoid waste in expensive yarns and allowed me to build up a great portfolio of files with notes on what went well and what went wrong and how to fix it for further development.

 
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I also explored how the same knit changes depending on material, treatment and finish.

I also explored how the same knit changes depending on material, treatment and finish.